All Posts tagged Partnership at drugfree.org

NJ Spolight-OP-ED: PREVENT OPIATE ADDICTION AT THE SOURCE THROUGH EDUCATING PATIENTS

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/15/01/08/op-ed-prevent-opiate-addiction-at-the-source-through-educating-patients/

Over the past two decades, the number of prescriptions for opiate-based painkillers has tripled, while dosages have grown stronger

Elaine and Steve Pozycki

Elaine and Steve Pozycki

The prime source for the national explosion of opiate addiction — whether in the form of painkillers such as OxyContin or in the form of illegal street drugs such as heroin — is the dramatic increase in the use of opiate-based prescription drugs. Over the past 20 years, there has been a threefold increase in the number of prescriptions issued for opiate-based painkillers, as well as a major step-up in dosage, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthcare providers wrote 259 million prescriptions in 2012 alone. Further, it has been well-documented that some people when they can no longer get access to prescription painkillers feed their opiate addiction by turning to heroin.

The costs in lost and ruined lives from what the CDC refers to as a “national epidemic” of opiate addiction continue to rise. Drug overdoses are the number one cause of accidental death in the United States. In 2010, nearly 20,000 people died from an overdose of opiates — nearly 17,000 from prescription painkillers and an additional 3,000 from heroin. It is time for a comprehensive approach that matches the scale of the problem and that begins at its source—the overprescribing of prescription painkillers and the underinforming of patients about the risks of this medication and possible alternatives

We are pleased to report that there is legislation moving through the New Jersey legislature that does exactly that. Senator Loretta Weinberg (D-37th) and Senator Joe Vitale (D-19th) are putting forward a proposed law (S-2366) requiring physicians and other health practitioners to discuss with a patient the risks of physical and psychological addiction and the availability of potential alternative medications, before issuing a prescription for an opiate-based painkiller.

In cases where the patient is under 18 years old, this discussion must take place with a parent or a guardian From the harm that too many of our children and families have experienced because a teenager becomes addicted to opiates, we know just how important providing this essential knowledge can be. To ensure compliance with the essential provisions of this legislation, the practitioner must obtain a written acknowledgement from the patient or the patient’s parent or guardian that this discussion has taken place.

The need for moving forward with this kind of approach is underscored by the American Academy of Neurology’s recent determination that the risks of powerful narcotic painkillers outweigh their benefits for treating chronic headaches, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. The Academy noted that 50 percent of patients who took opioids for at least three months are still on them five years later.

Further, more appropriate and limited prescribing of prescription painkillers will help reduce heroin use by reducing the number of people who crave opiates. AS CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H., said, “Addressing prescription opioid abuse by changing prescribing is likely to prevent heroin use in the long term

Just as importantly, there is strong public support in New Jersey for this approach. In a recent FDU Public Mind Poll, more than two-out-of-three New Jersey parents indicated support for a law requiring that they be notified if their child’s prescription contained potentially addictive medication

We are pleased to report that this legislation, one component of a comprehensive package aimed at taking on New Jersey’s addiction problem passed the Senate recently, by a margin of 36 to 1. Still, there is a long way to go before final passage and it will require all of us to make our voices heard. It is particularly important for people to communicate their support to their Assembly members, since that is the next hurdle, we anticipate an open and fair discussion of this legislation in the Assembly Health Committee chaired by Assemblyman Herb Conaway (D-7th) soon after the New Year.

Senator Weinberg and Vitale’s legislation (S-2366 ) is a critical prevention measure which attacks the problem directly at its source. Treatment after the fact is still important to do, but because of the brain changes caused by opiate addiction, it is a hard, difficult road to recovery for too many and the results are hit or miss. We must put preventing addiction in the first place at the forefront and that begins with passing this essential measure.

Elaine and Steve Pozycki are board members of the Partnership for a Drug-Free New Jersey, with Elaine serving as co-chair. Steve Pozycki is the founder, chairman, and CEO of SJP Properties.

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The New Year always brings change for each one of us. One thing that we don’t have control over time moving on.  Yet, the things that we do have control over we need to stay focused on to better ourselves and the world around us.

I haven’t posted in a while.  I have been busy continuing my education.  I have returned to school as a full time student and it has consumed 8 days of week of work.  In order for me to make a difference in my advocacy movements, I want to gain as much education as I can.  So I apologize for slacking, however will do my best in 2015!!!

Wishing you all a peaceful New Year!!  happy-new-year-2015-greetings-wallpaper

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The Partnership at DrugFree.org:

 

Teens will be teens. They sleep late, fail a test here and there or get uncharacteristically moody. But what if these behaviors are happening more often than usual, or all at the same time? You know your teen better than anyone, but it is important to know what to look for if you suspect he or she may be abusing medicine.

  1. Health concerns. Keep an eye out for changes in your teen’s physical health, like constricted pupils, nausea or vomiting, flushed skin or dizziness. Look further into anything that seems strange.
  2. Changes in behavior. The signs of medicine abuse aren’t always physical. Look for changes in behavior – like sudden changes in relationships with their family or friends, anxiety, erratic mood swings or decreased motivation. It’s no secret that teens can be moody, but be on the lookout for drastic differences in the way your child behaves.
  3.  Home-related signs. If you’ve noticed belongings  disappearing around the house, or found some unusual objects appearing – like straws, burnt spoons, aluminum foil or medicine bottles – this could be a sign of medicine abuse. Count – and lock up – the medicine you have in your home and safely dispose of any expired medicine.
  4. Trouble in school. Take note of how your teen is doing in school, including any change in homework habits and grades. A rapid drop in grades, loss of interest in schoolwork and complaints from teachers could be indicators that there’s a problem.
  5. Things just seem off. You know your child better than anyone and you know when something’s not right. Trust your gut, and talk to your teen about your concerns.

With one in four kids reporting abuse of prescription drugs in their lifetime, it’s important to take action right away if you do suspect medicine abuse. Don’t be afraid to talk – and listen – to your teen, work through things together and get help if necessary.

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Advocates Urge FDA to Revoke Approval of Painkiller Zohydro

 

More than 40 addiction treatment, health care and consumer groups are urging the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to reverse its decision to approve the prescription painkiller Zohydro ER (extended release), CNN reports.

 

The drug is a pure form of the painkiller hydrocodone. The FDA approved Zohydro ER in October for patients with pain that requires daily, around-the-clock, long-term treatment that cannot be treated with other drugs. Drugs such as Vicodin contain a combination of hydrocodone and other painkillers such as acetaminophen. Zohydro ER is set to become available in March, the article notes.

 

In December 2012, a panel of experts assembled by the FDA voted against recommending approval of Zohydro ER. The panel cited concerns over the potential for addiction.

 

Zohydro is designed to be released over time, and can be crushed and snorted by people seeking a strong, quick high. The opioid drug OxyContin has been reformulated to make it harder to crush or dissolve, but Zohydro does not include similar tamper-resistant features.

 

In a letter to FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret Hamburg, the coalition of health groups, wrote, “In the midst of a severe drug epidemic fueled by overprescribing of opioids, the very last thing the country needs is a new, dangerous, high-dose opioid. Too many people have already become addicted to similar opioid medications, and too many lives have been lost.”

 

The health groups include the American Society of Addiction Medicine, Public Citizen Health Research Group, Phoenix House, the Hazelden Foundation, and Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing.

 

In December, 28 attorneys general wrote to Commissioner Hamburg, saying they believe the approval of Zohydro ER “has the potential to exacerbate our nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic because this drug will be the first hydrocodone-only opioid narcotic that is reportedly five to ten times more potent than traditional hydrocodone products, and it has no abuse-deterrent properties.”

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Home + School Programs Modestly Slow Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

 

Home » News » Substance Abuse News » Home + School Programs Modestly Slow Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/02/19/home-school-programs-modestly-slow-teen-prescription-drug-abuse/66113.html

Home + School Programs Modestly Slow Teen Prescription Drug Abuse

 

By Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on February 19, 2014

 

Home + School Programs Modestly Slow Teen Prescription Drug AbuseTeen prescription drug abuse programs have experienced mixed levels of effectiveness, ranging from big drops in drug abuse to no measurable effect.

 

The finding comes from a study of 11,000 teenagers by researchers at Duke and Pennsylvania State universities.

 

The best results came from pairing a school-based program with a home-based intervention, resulting in a 10 percent decrease in abuse rates.

 

By contrast, most school-based programs were ineffective when used by themselves, with just one exception.

 

While the results are sobering (no pun intended), the six-year study is among the first to measure the success and cost-effectiveness of prescription drug abuse prevention efforts.

 

Abuse of prescription opioids, a form of painkiller, is the fastest-growing form of illicit drug use in the country, affecting more than 12 million Americans and killing more people annually than heroin and cocaine combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended restricting access to painkillers such as Percocet, Oxycontin, and Vicodin.

 

“These drugs are very available, and highly addictive,” said Max Crowley, Ph.D., an NIH Research Fellow at Duke’s Center for Child and Family Policy.

 

“There’s a growing national debate about whether we should restrict access to these drugs, but at the same time, the drugs are hugely important for pain management. What’s being left out of the debate is the role of prevention.”

 

Crowley and his co-authors found that only one school-based program was effective when used by itself.

 

The Life Skills Training program resulted in 4 percent lower drug abuse rates, compared with a control group. The 18-session course teaches social skills that build competence and encourage assertiveness.

 

“Life Skills Training was also among the most cost-effective programs studied, costing an average of $15 per child,” Crowley said. “By contrast, the study notes that prescription drug abusers cost society an average of $7,500 each for treatment and other expenses, by conservative estimates.”

 

Life Skills was among four prevention programs the researchers studied.

 

The team looked at 28 rural public school districts in Iowa and Pennsylvania, tracking students from grades 6 through 12. They examined a home-based program called Strengthening Families 10-14 and three school-based programs: Life Skills Training, Project Alert, and All Stars.

 

All four were “universal” programs that were offered to all teenagers in a given district.

 

The researchers analyzed pairs of demographically similar school districts. Within each pair, one community received a prevention program or programs, and the other did not.

 

The research team surveyed teenagers each year, asking teens to anonymously report whether they had ever used a prescription painkiller for nonmedical purposes. The authors then compared drug use levels in districts that received interventions versus those that did not.

 

In communities that received no intervention, a quarter of high school seniors reported having misused prescription painkillers.

 

The most substantial reductions in abuse rates occurred when the Life Skills program was combined with the Strengthening Families program. The All Stars intervention also yielded reductions when it was used alongside the Strengthening Families program.

 

Crowley said he hopes policymakers and educators will put the findings to use.

 

“Policymakers and other leaders are actively searching for efficient ways to curb prescription drug abuse,” Crowley said.

 

“These results give policymakers options regarding how to handle this growing epidemic.”

 

The study appears online in Preventive Medicine.

 

Source: Duke University

 

 

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National Prescription Drug Take Back Day – Saturday, October 26, 2013

National Prescription Drug Take Back Day – Saturday, October 26, 2013 –

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The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to provide a safe, convenient, and responsible means of disposing of prescription drugs, while also educating the general public about the potential for abuse of medications.

Drop Off Location Sites: http://1.usa.gov/16TRMy9

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